Uber and Lyft drivers were involved in 1,098 crashes in Boston last year, accounting for about a quarter of all motor vehicle crashes in the city, according to recently released data.

StreetsBlog Mass reported that Uber and Lyft drivers were involved in 1,098 crashes in the city of Boston last year, according to recently released data from the state agency that regulates app-based ride-sharing companies. This accounts for about a quarter of all motor vehicle crashes in the city.

(AFP)

AFP

(AFP)

This year, the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities released its first annual report on Uber and Lyft activity across the state. A data column in the reporting spreadsheet counts the number of crashes involving the company’s drivers.

The 2021 report shows that Uber and Lyft drivers were involved in 2,267 crashes in Massachusetts in 2021. Nearly half of these (1,098) occurred in Boston.

That’s roughly in line with the company’s percentage of operations in Boston compared to the rest of the state, as 46 percent of all Uber or Lyft trips in Massachusetts last year came from within Boston.

But the data also appears to show that Uber and Lyft drivers are far more likely to be involved in a crash in Boston than anywhere else in Massachusetts. The MassDOT crash database recorded 124,577 crashes in the state in 2021. That means crashes involving Uber or Lyft drivers accounted for about 2 percent of all crashes in the state last year. That’s a far cry from the figure of almost a quarter in downtown Boston.

In a statement about the numbers, the Boston Department of Transportation (BTD) said, “The City of Boston is prioritizing safer streets for all. This starts with redesigning streets to reduce risk and deter unsafe driver behavior. While we Most of the street design changes in 2019 are intended to deliver broad safety benefits, but strong curbside management is especially important for the safe operations of multinational companies (i.e. Uber and Lyft) and other gig economy companies operating on our streets.”

Read more at StreetsBlog Mass.

Lucas Nolan is a reporter for Housekaart News covering free speech and online censorship issues.follow him on twitter @lucasnolan

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